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RME Launches Advanced MADI/AES Format Converter

Friday May 27, 2005
RME expands its MADI series with the ADI-642, an 8-channel format converter from MADI to AES and vice versa. Amongst other applications, the unit can serve as an AES/EBU frontend for the Hammerfall DSP MADI PCI card. Up to 192 kHz at 24 bit are supported...
RME Launches Advanced MADI/AES Format Converter

RME expands its MADI series with the ADI-642, an 8-channel format converter from MADI to AES and vice versa. Amongst other applications, the unit can serve as an AES/EBU frontend for the Hammerfall DSP MADI PCI card. Up to 192 kHz at 24 bit are supported. It also features a 72x72 routing matrix, which can assign an individual input channel to every single output channel, allowing free configuration of all 64 MADI channels and the 8 AES channels.

Additional features include:

  • Native support for AES Double and Quad Wire
  • Native support for MADI Double and Quad Wire
  • Direct conversion between these formats
  • Automatic Delay Compensation when using more than one unit
  • Analog stereo monitor output, up to 192 kHz
  • Detailed status display for MADI and AES
  • Completely remote controlable via MIDI
  • Transfer of MIDI data via MADI
  • SteadyClock for maximum jitter reduction and clock regeneration

The unit handles 64 MADI channels of 24 bit audio at sampling frequencies up to 48kHz, 32 channels up to 96kHz, and 16 channels up to 192kHz. All channels are transferred across a single cable, either coaxial (BNC) or optical network cable. In both cases, cable lengths of more than 100 meters can be achieved. The AES/EBU channels are provided via 4 XLR inputs and outputs, respectively. The ADI-642 accepts 56 channels and 64 channels as well as 96k and 192k frame at its input, and can be set to generate those formats at its output.

A fully automatic input selection between optical and coaxial input offers a useful redundancy mode for critical applications. Status displays give information about Lock and Sync states, audio content and the physical quality of the incoming signal.

The ADI-642 is compatible to all forms of increasing the sample rate. It supplies word clock in Single, Double and Quad Speed, distributes Double Wire 96kHz signals into the MADI data stream and to the AES ports, and even supports the double MADI sample rate (96K frame). The same applies to 192 kHz (Quad Wire, 192 kHz frame).

With the 72 x 72 Matrix Router, an input signal can be assigned to every output channel, both for AES and MADI. This not only allows free signal routing during format conversion, but also forwarding and routing of signals within the same format. An input signal can also be distributed to any number of outputs. With more than one ADI-642, several MADI signals can be combined (merged) to one MADI stream.

16 MIDI channels can be transferred across MADI (even with 64 audio channels). The device can be fully remote controlled and configured via MIDI, and all status displays can be queried through MIDI. Each ADI-642 can be given a separate ID, allowing separate remote controllability of various devices with only one MIDI channel.

RME's SteadyClock provides jitter reduction, allowing any clock signal to be improved and refreshed, and subsequently be used as reference clock at the word clock output. The last valid sample frequency will be retained in case of a loss of the input signal.

Automatic Delay Compensation eliminates technically inherent delays when signals are transferred from one unit to another. Each device automatically recognizes its position within the chain and ensures sample synchronized operation of all AES inputs and outputs.

The analog monitor output operates in stereo and has a low impedance. It can be used as line and headphone output and supports 192 kHz at 119 dBA SNR. The routing matrix can assign any of the 36 stereo input pairs to the monitor output.

For more information, visit their web site at www.rme-audio.com

Friday May 27, 2005 ARCHIVE
David Mellor has been creating music and recording in professional and home studios for more than 30 years. This website is all about learning how to improve and have more fun with music and recording. If you enjoy creating music and recording it, then you're definitely in the right place :-)
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