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The difference between minimum-phase and linear-phase EQ on transient signals such as snare drum

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Akai S1100 Version 2.0: Adding hard disk recording to your sampler (part 1)

S1100 owner David Mellor tries the latest soft and hardware upgrade to Akai's top-of-the-range sampler. Does it provide all you need in a hard disk recorder at a bargain price?

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S1100 owner David Mellor tries the latest soft and hardware upgrade to Akai's top-of-the-range sampler. Does it provide all you need in a hard disk recorder at a bargain price?

The answer to the above question is, “Well, yes and no”. As we all know, the hard disk, and its close relation the magneto-optical disc, are going to become very very popular over the next couple of years. Right now there are a number of very expensive hard disk recording systems, but only a small number at what one might call an almost affordable price. Digidesign’s Sound Tools, upgraded to Pro Tools and soon to be re-released in an updated Sound Tools version, is probably the bottom end of the hard disk market if you’re looking for a system which will do most of the things you would want a stereo hard disk recorder to do. But Sound Tools is still relatively costly after you have budgeted for the necessary Apple Macintosh II computer, and if your studio is still at a developing stage and working at the margins of profitability then you might be tempted to look at say the ADAS system which while it can indeed record onto hard disk and give reasonable value for money, its editing functions are rather limited. Soon we shall see other systems competing with Sound Tools in the hard disk arena and you may wish to wait and see what they have to offer. If you happen to be an S1100 owner and use a hard disk for sample storage, then you now have a way of getting into hard disk at a lowish level relatively cheaply, in fact very cheaply, while you wait to decide among the upcoming full function hard disk editors.

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By David Mellor Thursday January 1, 2004
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