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Equipping Your Home Recording Studio - A free download from Audio Masterclass

An Introduction to Equalization - A free download from Audio Masterclass

An Introduction to Compression: Basic Compression - A free download from Audio Masterclass

This voice over studio looks like something out of Monty Python

Can you hear the subtle effect of the knee control of the compressor? (With audio and video demonstrations)

How to find the best tempo (BPM) for your recording

The professional way to make sure your mics are connected correctly

7 important microphone types that you should know and the benefits of each

Setting microphone preamplifier gain to achieve both adequate headroom and a good signal-to-noise ratio

Two microphone preamplifiers compared at Abbey Road Studio 2 - tube and transistor

One simple step you must take to make sure your masters sound really great

Can you hear the difference between a square wave and a sine wave?

The Making of a CD - FREE DOWNLOAD

A line array for guitarists? Or, could you handle a 4 x 4 x 12 stack?

Why only have a two-cabinet guitar stack? Why not have a 4 x 4 x 12 stack going all the way up to the ceiling? But you might have some angry roadies to pacify (or bribe...)

In large-scale public address, it is now common to use so-called 'line array' loudspeaker systems. Basically, a line array consists of a number of full-range cabinets wired so that they hang in a vertical column.

The benefit of a line array is in its directional characteristics - it disperses sound widely in the horizontal plane, while tightly focusing it in the vertical.

The result is that it delivers sound more effectively to the back of the auditorium than other configurations of loudspeakers.

In an idle moment when I was musing on the subject of 4 x 12 guitar cabinets - entirely normal for anyone interested in music and sound engineering, I assure you - the thought came to be that the 'stack' configuration where one 4 x 12 cabinet is placed on top of another is very much like a line array.

OK, it's a fairly short and squat line array, but a line array nonetheless.

But then I thought, why stop at two 4 x 12 cabinets? Why not extend vertically?

So the idea came to me of having four 4 x 12 cabinets mounted vertically, with proper safety measures in place.

To get an idea of what this would be like, stand up and imagine a two-cabinet stack that is as tall as you are, right in front of you where it would be if you were adjusting the controls. Now look up and imagine one twice as high...

Impressive, isn't it?

Yes, a four-cabinet stack would look mighty on stage. OK, so the roadies wouldn't like it - but they seem to manage PA line arrays, so I don't see why they should not adapt quickly.

And you can be sure that your sound will penetrate all the way to the back of the venue!

The only other consideration would be... where do you put the amplifier?

Having the amp on top conjures visions of the guitarist going up by ladder to turn the volume up a little (to 11?). Perhaps the center of the stack would be the best position.

OK, here's the challenge - when you have done this for real and played a gig with a 4 x 4 x 12 stack, send us the pics and we will publish them right here, along with any other band info you would like to promote.

Who is going to be first? (Perhaps the bass player with an 8 x Ampeg 8 x 10 stack!)

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By David Mellor Monday September 5, 2005
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