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Automated Mixing (part 5)

A post by David Mellor
Thursday January 01, 2004
With a VCA automation system you will probably concentrate on making all the finicky little moves that are necessary to get the vocal to a consistent level, making sure that all the final consonants of words that singers just love to under-pronounce are lifted a bit...
Automated Mixing (part 5)

With a VCA automation system you will probably concentrate on making all the finicky little moves that are necessary to get the vocal to a consistent level, making sure that all the final consonants of words that singers just love to under-pronounce are lifted a bit. Once this is done you can start mixing for real. But hang on a minute - if you have written a complex series of moves just to correct the level of the vocal, won’t the system overwrite these moves when you start to write your artistic changes? No it won’t, because VCA automation systems have an ‘update’ or ‘trim’ mode where you can superimpose one set of moves on top of another. To trim, depending on which system you are using, you will probably set the fader to halfway (remember that the audio doesn’t go through the fader - think of it as a more convenient level setting tool than a mouse), and upward moves will increase the level, downward moves will decrease it. Alternatively, you may have to set the fader to a ‘null’ position where its physical position matches its audio position, as indicated by a pair of LEDs, but the principle is the same. VCA automation systems are great for updating since there can be total independence between fader position and audio level.

In the case of moving fader systems, updating is a little more complex since the level of the audio is inextricably linked to the position of the fader knob. Moving fader systems usually have touch sensitive fader caps so if you want to change a move, all you have to do is grab the fader and do it. The computer will interpret this as a temporary switch into write mode for as long as you touch the cap. Fortunately, any decent moving fader system will provide fader grouping (as will a VCA system) so you can control the movements of one fader with another. So on the vocal channel fader you can write a complex series of moves, and then make this fader a slave to a fader you don’t happen to be using, which will then be called the group master. You can now superimpose more moves using this fader without overwriting the previous set of moves you had painstakingly created. If you are worried about having two faders controlling one signal path, fear not - a good moving fader automation system will have a ‘coalesce’ function which aggregates the moves back onto the channel fader and dissolves the group.

I hope I’ve explained the basics of automation well enough so that you can now go away and compare the various products on the market. Not every system will have every feature, and some systems will not implement particular features as well as others. My advice is to read all the manufacturer’s literature thoroughly and then go to your dealer and ask lots of questions beginning, “How do you…”. Hopefully you’ll find the system that suits the way you want to work.

A post by David Mellor
Thursday January 01, 2004 ARCHIVE
David Mellor has been creating music and recording in professional and home studios for more than 30 years. This website is all about learning how to improve and have more fun with music and recording. If you enjoy creating music and recording it, then you're definitely in the right place :-)
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