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Andy Hunter insists on Liquid technology. Why? “It just blew me away”...

Thursday November 30, 2006
Why take 60 boxes into the studio when there’s one piece of equipment that can do it all – for producer/engineer Andy Hunter the choice is clear...
Andy Hunter insists on Liquid technology. Why? “It just blew me away”...

Why take 60 boxes into the studio when there’s one piece of equipment that can do it all – for producer/engineer Andy Hunter the choice is clear... Andy Hunter is a versatile man to have in the studio. He always knew a career in music was what he wanted, but it was quitting his A-levels to work as a sound and lighting engineer that would prove to be the decisive turning point. During this time he began DJing, which in turn led him into the world of music production where the fledgling producer indulged his passion for writing electronic music. The year 2000 saw Andy signed to EMI where he’d rack up a string of critically acclaimed releases. As well as establishing himself as an artist in his own right, Andy’s music has also been picked up for a stack of high-profile outings, including soundtrack work (Matrix Reloaded, The Italian Job), as well as TV shows (Ugly Betty, Grey’s Anatomy), and video games (Need For Speed Underground, Burnout, SSX 3). Yes, Andy Hunter is indeed a versatile man to have in the studio. But it was co-producing his last album – Colours, out this Spring on Nettwerk Records – with production legend Robbie Bronnimann that introduced him to the Liquid world. “All of the vocals and guitars were recorded with the Liquid Channel. I was impressed with the sound we were getting at the recording stage. Sure, I have preamps in my studio, but the fact that Focusrite’s Liquid Channel could emulate those and another 60 preamps... well, that just blew me away. It was exactly the same with the Liquid Mix as well.” “Both products sound absolutely amazing – they come packed with a load of different emulations, so you have a lot of different treatments right there at your fingertips. The Liquid Channel I use for recording vocals and guitars, while the Liquid Mix is usually pressed into service on my vocals and strings – or in fact anything that I need to give warmth too.” “With Focusrite’s Liquid technology everything is at hand, so I don't have to keep patching in to different preamps and outboard to get the sound I’m looking for – you can simply change the setting. And I love that you can control the whole set-up from your computer, it really saves you a lot of time!” “Before I heard them in action I was a bit skeptical about Focusrite’s Liquid technology, whether it could hold its own against some superb vintage EQs, compressors and preamps, but after spending some time with them in the studio I was impressed. Just take the vocals on my latest album – they sound really warm and have a lot of clarity.” “For me it's about getting a sound and a tone that I really love. If I don't absolutely love it then it's simply not good enough for my music. I ask myself that question on every little thing that goes into a track, whether it’s something as fleeting as a snare drum, or as pivotal as a whole vocal performance.”

www.focusrite.com

Thursday November 30, 2006 ARCHIVE
David Mellor has been creating music and recording in professional and home studios for more than 30 years. This website is all about learning how to improve and have more fun with music and recording. If you enjoy creating music and recording it, then you're definitely in the right place :-)
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